Difference between revisions of "ID Module"

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[[Category:Glossary]]
 
[[Category:Glossary]]
 
[[Category:Hardware]]
 
[[Category:Hardware]]
The ID Module is the simplest component of all the chordata system, but its role is vital. It allows several [[K-Ceptor]]s to coexist in the same branch by setting different translation values to each one.
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The ID Module is a '''deprecated part''' of the Chordata system.
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It was used during prototyping to set the value of the address translator of the [[K-Ceptor]]s, allowing them to coexist in the same branch by setting different translation values to each one.
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'''Starting from the K-Ceptor R2.2 the resistors that were on the ID module can be soldered directly to the board'''
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Many of the concepts on this page still significant for a better understanding on how the Chordata system works.
  
 
[[File:K-Ceptor-wired.jpg |thumb| frame |  An ID module with a translation value of 4, attached to a [[K-Ceptor]]]]
 
[[File:K-Ceptor-wired.jpg |thumb| frame |  An ID module with a translation value of 4, attached to a [[K-Ceptor]]]]
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[[File:DefBypedConf-IDModules.png | 800px]]{{clearfix}}
 
[[File:DefBypedConf-IDModules.png | 800px]]{{clearfix}}
  
==How much ID modules do I need?==
 
For a particular capture you will need one ID module for each K-Ceptor. The basic set for the [[Default Biped Configuration]] is composed of:
 
*5x ID modules with value = 0
 
*5x ID modules with value = 1
 
*5x ID modules with value = 2
 
 
At the time of buying or building your ID modules is advised to get some more than just those, in order to be able to eventually create different configurations.
 
If you are sure that's the only thing that you will ever be capturing then you don't need more.
 
  
 
==Soldering an ID Module==
 
==Soldering an ID Module==

Revision as of 15:48, 16 March 2019

The ID Module is a deprecated part of the Chordata system. It was used during prototyping to set the value of the address translator of the K-Ceptors, allowing them to coexist in the same branch by setting different translation values to each one.

Starting from the K-Ceptor R2.2 the resistors that were on the ID module can be soldered directly to the board

Many of the concepts on this page still significant for a better understanding on how the Chordata system works.

An ID module with a translation value of 4, attached to a K-Ceptor

Rationale

Every K-Ceptor should get a unique translation value within its branch. It should be set in hardware with just a few components, see the end of this article for more details. Having those components soldered directly on the K-Ceptor would reduce the overall ability of the system to create arbitrary hierarchies. Making those values configurable directly on the K-Ceptor would make that unit bulkier or more complex. Instead the ID module allows a flexible configuration of the translation value without adding much complexity to the system.

Usage

The ID module has to be attached to the J5 connector of a K-Ceptor. The recommended procedure is to attach all the K-Ceptors to the performer's body, and then distribute the ID modules to match the hierarchy that you are attempting to capture. For example for the Default Biped Configuration the ID module are distributed as in the following scheme

DefBypedConf-IDModules.png


Soldering an ID Module

Two things has to be soldered on every ID module:

  • A 2x3 (2.54mm pitch) header underneath the module.
  • A bridge (piece of wire, or metallic lead) between the pins of the R4 footprint.

The resistors on R1(RLT) and R2(RLB) are chosen according to this table:

Voltage value

ID Number

Resistors [Kohm]

XORL/VCC

Dec.

Hex

R5 (RLT)

R6 (RLB)

≤ 0.03125

0

0x00

Open

Short

0.09375 ±0.015

1

0x01

976

102

0.15625 ±0.015

2

0x02

976

182

0.21875 ±0.015

3

0x03

1000

280

0.28125 ±0.015

4

0x04

1000

392

0.34375 ±0.015

5

0x05

1000

523

0.40625 ±0.015

6

0x06

1000

681

0.46875 ±0.015

7

0x07

1000

887

0.53125 ±0.015

8

0x08

887

1000

0.59375 ±0.015

9

0x09

681

1000

0.65625 ±0.015

10

0x0a

523

1000

0.71875 ±0.015

11

0x0b

392

1000

0.78125 ±0.015

12

0x0c

280

1000

0.84375 ±0.015

13

0x0d

182

976

0.90625 ±0.015

14

0x0e

102

976

≥ 0.96875

15

0x0f

Short

Open

How it works

To better understand its functionality let’s quicky review how the address translator on the K-Ceptor gets its translation value.

Whenever the LTC4316 detects a rising edge on its ENABLE pin, it reads the voltage on the XORH and XORL pins and uses those values to set the upper and lower part of the translation byte according to the table above.

The voltages are referenced to VCC so a resistive divider at each of these pins is the most convenient way to set the voltages, and that’s precisely what the ID module is: just a convenient way to have a voltage divider with a label.

If you look at the schematics, or footprints and traces on the ID Module, you might notice that there’s more to it than just a single voltage divider. Those extra component are an inheritance of chordata’s early prototypical stages and might change in the future.