ID Module

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The ID Module is a deprecated part of the Chordata system. It was used during prototyping to set the value of the address translator of the K-Ceptors, allowing them to coexist in the same branch by setting different translation values to each one.

Starting from the K-Ceptor R2.2 the resistors that were on the ID module can be soldered directly to the board

Many of the concepts on this page still significant for a better understanding on how the Chordata system works.

A current version of the K-Ceptor. An ID_module can still be used, but the recommended way of assigning the translation value is to solder the resistors directly to it.

Rationale[edit]

Every K-Ceptor should get a unique translation value within its branch. It should be set in hardware with just a few components, see the end of this article for more details. Having those components soldered directly on the K-Ceptor would reduce the overall ability of the system to create arbitrary hierarchies. Making those values configurable directly on the K-Ceptor would make that unit bulkier or more complex. Instead the ID module allows a flexible configuration of the translation value without adding much complexity to the system.

While what stated on the last paragraph is true, the ID_module itself with the connector resulted on an overly bulkier appendix to the K-Ceptor. And it was sometimes responsible of false contacts that resulted on misconfigurations of the translation value, or even failures of the complete K-Ceptor.

Usage[edit]

The ID module has to be attached to the J5 connector of a K-Ceptor. The recommended procedure is to attach all the K-Ceptors to the performer's body, and then distribute the ID modules to match the hierarchy that you are attempting to capture. For example for the Default Biped Configuration the ID module are distributed as in the following scheme

The ID_Module is not used anymore. To capture with the Default Biped Configuration you should arrange the K-Ceptors as in the image below

DefBypedConf-IDModules.png


Soldering the translation value resistors[edit]

Two things has to be soldered on every ID module:

  • A 2x3 (2.54mm pitch) header underneath the module.
  • A bridge (piece of wire, or metallic lead) between the pins of the R4 footprint.

The resistors on R5(RLT) and R6(RLB) can be soldered directly to the K-Ceptor. They are chosen according to this table:

Voltage value

ID Number

Resistors [Kohm]

XORL/VCC

Dec.

Hex

R5 (RLT)

R6 (RLB)

≤ 0.03125

0

0x00

Open

Short

0.09375 ±0.015

1

0x01

976

102

0.15625 ±0.015

2

0x02

976

182

0.21875 ±0.015

3

0x03

1000

280

0.28125 ±0.015

4

0x04

1000

392

0.34375 ±0.015

5

0x05

1000

523

0.40625 ±0.015

6

0x06

1000

681

0.46875 ±0.015

7

0x07

1000

887

0.53125 ±0.015

8

0x08

887

1000

0.59375 ±0.015

9

0x09

681

1000

0.65625 ±0.015

10

0x0a

523

1000

0.71875 ±0.015

11

0x0b

392

1000

0.78125 ±0.015

12

0x0c

280

1000

0.84375 ±0.015

13

0x0d

182

976

0.90625 ±0.015

14

0x0e

102

976

≥ 0.96875

15

0x0f

Short

Open

How it works[edit]

To better understand its functionality let’s quicky review how the address translator on the K-Ceptor gets its translation value.

Whenever the LTC4316 detects a rising edge on its ENABLE pin, it reads the voltage on the XORH and XORL pins and uses those values to set the upper and lower part of the translation byte according to the table above.

The voltages are referenced to VCC so a resistive divider at each of these pins is the most convenient way to set the voltages, and that’s precisely what the ID module is was: just a convenient way to have a voltage divider with a label.